The Shifting Role of the Tech Integrator

Here’s a snapshot of a typical day in my life as an integrator:

Zip down to classroom 1 to put out apple TV fire. Respond to 3 emails from students who can’t remember their Educate passwords. Touch base with teacher using GoogleForms for feedback. Respond to text from assistant principal to check student’s use of laptop. Show up late for meeting with a teacher about how they can improve collaborative techniques using technology. Beg forgiveness and begin the “tool pitch.” Return call to frantic 7th-grade parent who is concerned about Facebook activity…

You get it. More often than not, an integrator’s job is to  react to change. Sometimes it’s big change- a new LMS or a new model of teaching. Most often it’s small, “just in time” help that gets a teacher or a student over a small hump and back on track. We listen to teachers when they say “I wish I had a tool that…” and review new tools with an eye to where they might best fit in different content areas and learning environments.

My job description tasks me with improving teaching and learning through the use of technology. This means I have to stay on top of the tools available to enhance the learning process, stay educated about best practices in pedagogy and the district’s direction, and develop professional development for teachers that is largely voluntary and rarely attended. This isn’t to say that teachers don’t want to learn- on the contrary, they often speak about wanting to use technology to improve engagement and understanding. What they lack is a 30-hour day within which to fit me in.

Technology has played a large role in our change and I am proud of our staff for the way they have embraced change and learned new skills in order to provide better opportunities for their students to have “voice and choice” in their learning. That said, my job has gotten harder and harder the deeper we get into proficiency-based learning.

It used to be easy. Teachers who were doing days of whole class instruction had the luxury of allowing me to come in and demonstrate something like Kahoot as a review tool or how to properly use presentation software. Now it’s different. In a class of 20 students, you may have four or five different levels and learning targets going on at once. The teacher is now a facilitator, students are working on personalized learning pathways, and I am on the outside looking in.

When a school changes, everyone changes. How the administration uses their integrators needs to change as well. Here’s why:

Integrators are teachers first

More often than not, integrators have been classroom teachers. We understand that tools and strategies just have to work. Because of our classroom experience, we can “vet” tools for ease of use and come up with strategies that will lessen issues – like developing password protocols and recognizing tools that might not work well with networks. And, because we are teachers first, we have the necessary understanding of pedagogy and scaffolding when it comes to finding tools and resources that move learning forward rather than merely entertain students.

Integrators know the staff

By the very nature of the job, integrators develop personal relationships with almost all of the staff. We know their interests and their classroom struggles. Some even let us in on their fears. For the most part, teachers trust us to be on their side. Most everyone knows who is resistant to change on a faculty.  Integrators often know why. Knowledge of this resistance provides insight into how we can structure professional development prior to the implementation of changes so we have more buy-in.

Integrators are collaborators

Most integrators have a curated personal learning network of innovative educators who are available 24/7 to vet ideas and offer advice and experience. This wealth of experience saves time and frustration as we learn from each other’s successes and struggles. Very often, integrators enlist teams of students to vet tools and provide feedback about how they think they will work in the classroom.

Changing the role of the Integrator

Most integrators are both small-change agents (at the classroom level) and reactors to systemic change at the building level. Rarely are they involved by administrators at either level to look at how they could become contributors in meeting the larger scale yearly goals of districts and individual buildings.

Here’s how it usually works: September comes and everyone is full of energy. I’ve been to a conference or two and have some ideas of ways I think technology can help in a couple of classrooms. I meet with teachers and offer my pitch. They are enthusiastic as well but already have their plans in place and this new idea feels like an add-on. “I’ll think about it,” is about as far as we get.

Here’s how it COULD work (and I risk the wrath of integrators everywhere with this one). What if my 180-day contract could be fulfilled anytime between one September and another? What if I could sit down with teachers as they are planning in the summer and work to turn technology into teach-nology? September is a bad time to make changes. July and August are GREAT times to look at how to do things better.

Teachers can receive professional contact hours during this time so they don’t feel as though they are working “for free.” I adjust my contracted schedule to reflect the number of days I work during the school year (there is no sub when I am out). No cost to the district.

We should be working closely with our curriculum coordinators to see how teach-nology fits best with district goals. If improving writing scores is a building or district goal for the year, what are the tools that will support that best- and how do we provide professional development that pairs pedagogy with tool mastery for resulting best practices? What scaffolded learning activities can we support with technology at each level so technology use becomes more effective? By focusing our efforts at a more global level, we create a community of practice that works to support all learners- even teachers.

 

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