Category Archives: mobile learning

5 Tips For Better Digital Content

When I was in college, my Anatomy and Physiology professor, Dr. Mason, was both the course lecturer and the author of our textbook. As such, he lectured from the book. Verbatim. You either got it or you spent hours in the library (this was, after all, pre-Internet Dark Ages) trying to find a source that could explain things in a different way. Or you found a friend who could explain the sodium/potassium exchange in layman’s terms. Failing this, you hoped there wasn’t much about that on the test.

I have to wonder how much things have really changed. Over the years we’ve fallen into a blended learning model that sometimes looks like a digital file cabinet from our classroom. I’m not faulting teachers here- they have responded to a request for transparency and that’s what we have. Students can go online and access most of the materials they have from classrooms. These are available at any time from any place with internet access. It’s all good, right?

Sometimes. If students understand content from class and need a review, placing our course materials online makes sense. These students can easily retrieve them and pick up where they left off.

This leaves out the population that doesn’t really understand what’s been presented in class. They make THINK they do- but when they get home and try to do things on their own, the wheels fall off the bus. Giving them the same resources you used in class may increase their frustration to the point where they give up.

Materials designed for face to face teaching and those that are appropriate for online learning can be very different. Each is valuable, but they are not always interchangeable. Materials for online consumption need to follow different guidelines. Here are five tips to get started:

  1. Make sure your students know what they are supposed to do. This might sound like a blinding flash of the obvious but bear with me. In class, you might provide a list of all the steps to complete a project in one document. Online you would do well to provide this in small discrete steps. Readers online tend to skim and may skip steps when a long list is provided. Make each step (or group of small steps) into its own task.
  2. Chunk your online content. Then chunk it again.  Do they really need a whole Keynote slideshow with your notes? Or would they be better off with smaller, more targeted explanations of key concepts? Think “SparkNotes” for your content. Make sure your content is digestible and students know what they should know as a result of viewing it.
  3. Use tools that scaffold learning. If you are asking students to read online articles, use a tool like InsertLearning to provide reading guides. These help students with comprehension and provide you with formative assessment information about their progress. For videos, you can use tools like Edpuzzle to help students check their understanding of content.
  4. Provide ways for students to know if they are on the right track. Nothing is more demoralizing than thinking you are finished, only to find you need to start over. Build in small assessments via tools like Edulastic, Quizlet, or google forms to provide feedback along the way.
  5. Build in ways for students to let you know they are stuck. This might be time in class or digitally based. You know what works best for your population.

 

Finally, take a critical look at your assignments. Use your student data to see what is and isn’t working in your material. Is there an assignment or assessment that seems to be stopping a large number of students in their tracks?  Sometimes a lesson redesign is what is needed to help move students forward.

 

Advertisements

Phone It In: 5th Grade Blogging

Last month I went fishing for elementary school teachers willing to try blogging in their classrooms. Second year teacher Ryan Burk shut his eyes and grabbed the bait- his class is glad he did!

Blogging is a great way to get kids thinking and writing. There is something about knowing you’ll be published that increases the care students take in writing. They are make a point to know facts,  write in a grammatically correct structure, and to sound as if they know what they are talking about.

We started the blog with a field trip to the Maine State Museum. The goal was to capture moments of interest from the museum tour so students could look back and remember what they saw and learned. We used EasyBlogger Jr, an app that allows students to take videos or photos and easily narrate over top. One tap of a button publishes their post to the classroom blog.

The setup was easy. I had the app on my phone but could just as easily have used an iPad. Ryan identified photographers and videographers ahead of time and we met with the class to go over guidelines:

  • The purpose of this project was to record learning, not to take selfies
  • Students had the choice of what they chose to blog about, but they needed to know facts about the items they showcased. They also needed to speak about them in their own words- no reading off the exhibit placards.
  • Fluency is important- students were encouraged to practice before posting.
  • Real people would be reading and listening to their work.

After a reminder in the museum lobby I gave them the phone and then we let go.

The kids roamed the museum in chaperoned groups. Our bloggers collaborated with their peers to determine what should be covered. They learned about the items they were looking at, took photos and videos, and became roving reporters. They posted their reports on the fly. Once back in the classroom they were eager to review what was published.

Ryan followed up in the classroom with a session on expanding the blog. What else, he asked, should they be reporting? His students chose eight categories that fit their needs with the understanding that these could be increased as needed.

IMG_3175.PNG

As an aside, we set the blog up a little differently than the app intends. Normally students each have an account identified with their name and photo within the app. For compliance with our digital citizenship curriculum we decided to create “content accounts” based on the categories the students chose. 

Students choose the category that best fits their post and stay within our internet safety rules by remaining anonymous.

The result? Students are excited about writing. They WANT to write and post to the blog. They plan their posts carefully for content and grammatical correctness. They look for feedback in the form of comments and use these comments to improve their work. Most importantly they are viewing content through a newer, worldwide lens. Families can follow the blog and get a birds-eye view of what’s going on in the classroom. Take a look at Mr. Burk’s Classroom Blog and send some feedback their way.

Improve Student Workflow with Home Screen Shortcuts

Workflow has been the buzzword of the month. My task list today included adding a customized Symbaloo webmix to all of the classroom laptops. The goal is to help our elementary students get where they need to go easily without worrying about their sometimes weak typing skills. We also have iPads in the classrooms and as I was plugging away I was thinking about how to get Symbaloo on the iPads too.

Then I realized it-  I don’t really need Symbaloo for the iPads. Many of the most used sites have apps that are already on the iPads. The one stickler was the link to the library card catalog. The librarian wants to be able to use Opals on the iPads but the website is long and difficult for students to type accurately. The bookmarking system on the iPads is not  convenient for students with fine motor issues.  We needed a better solution.

Image

Turns out it is SO EASY to put a shortcut to a website on an iPad home screen. Safari does almost all the work for you- and all you have to do is organize the resulting app-like tile onto your screen so it makes sense. I found a YouTube video that shows how to do it in 45 seconds.

This is what our library login site looks like. I wanted an icon to it that students could easily access on the iPad.

 

 

 

ImageA few clicks of the mouse and voila! It looks like another app (ok, it’s on my phone but it works the same on your iPad). It’s now moveable to wherever I think it works best in the lineup.

How can this work for you?

1. Many teachers have sites they use for practice that contain games or challenges for students to use. Create a folder and fill it with these “apps.” Or create folders by content area and organize your links that way.

2. Is your iPad too old to manage the newest OS updates? Often times new apps won’t run on an old OS. IXL is one such app. If there is a website available, and often times there is, you can still provide easy access to the tool.

Kids Love Kahoot!

Leave it to Coleene Moody to find tools for her class that engage her students. This time it’s Kahoot- a tool she learned about from a teacher friend but that was also showcased by Richard Byrne in his FreeTech4Teachers blog. In a nutshell it’s a quiz/review tool that comes packaged as a game. Kids don’t need to log in- they use a code- and they are presented with a teacher made quiz. It’s web-based and doesn’t require an app, so kids can use their phones or their laptops.

Coleene says the reaction to Kahoot has been very positive. “They ask me if they are going to GET to use it in class. They get competitive with each other- it’s a lot of fun and they love it.” She’s put it on her list of “must haves” for her classroom.

Curious now? Use the link above to read more about it on Richard’s blog- or head right over to Kahoot and create an account.